Redwood Summer Chapter 10 (repost)

A rewrite of chapter 10 of Redwood Summer, a novel of 1990 San Jose.  In this chapter Jason is attempting to fix the car problem from the previous chapter, and ends up having a conversation with his father about where he’s at in life, and about what Silicon Valley was in its agricultural past.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 10

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Redwood Summer Chapter 9 (repost)

Rewrite of chapter 9 for Redwood Summer. In this chapter Jason, the main character, and his friends Randy and Brian are driving home after seeing a movie, but what’s really happening is the growing apart of Jason and Randy. The breakdown that happens to Jason’s car is symbolic, not only of the relationship between Jason Randy, but also of the greater world changes that were happening below the surface in the summer of 1990 and were about to undermine the hard fought victory of the Cold War.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 9

Redwood Summer Chapter 8 (repost)

Reposting of Redwood Summer chapter 8 after giving it a rewrite. It isn’t too different from earlier version, just more expanded. In this chapter, Jason, the character, is having dinner with his entire family and his girlfriend, and it’s the last truly happy moment for him in the novel. After this chapter, the downward descent begins.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 8

Redwood Summer Chapter 7 (repost)

A rewrite of chapter 7, not much different than earlier version, but deeper. Action is right after action in chapter 6. Jason and Christine are at her nephew’s little league game, which symbolizes his journeys from participant to spectator, and contrasts with chapter 2 in which Jason plays a game of basketball with friends.

Also in this chapter Jason begins to lose control over his life as outside forces start to move him against his will.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 7

Redwood Summer Part II Chapter 6 (repost)

A rewrite and expansion of Redwood Summer chapter 6. This is the beginning of the second third of the novel. It takes place about a month after chapter 5 ends, and begins the changes that will happen in Jason’s, the main character, life. Jason and his mother have a debate about the pros and cons of technology, and then she reminds him that his sister will be home from college that later that day. She is a student at Cal Poly, and this her first mention in the novel. Mother suspects Jason may be envious of his sister, though he swears he isn’t.

via Redwood Summer Part II Chapter 6

Redwood Summer Chapter 5 (repost)

Rewrite of chapter 5.  The scene is the morning after a glorious party, and the end of the first third of the novel.  Everyone is hungover but happy, and the story reaches a peak at the end of this chapter, after which is the downward slide to its ultimate fate.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 5

Redwood Summer Chapter 4 (repost)

Just gave chapter 4 a rewrite, the party scene. One of the inspirations for this chapter is the party scene from The Great Gatsby. Not that I’m at that level of expertise, but learn from the best. What struck me about the party scene from Gatsby is that it’s so ethereal it almost seems unreal, and so beautiful that you know the happiness won’t last.  And I think it’s a match with my party scene because it represents a deliriously happy peak for all the characters that they’ll never reach again.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 4

Redwood Summer Chapter 3 (repost)

Just rewrote chapter 3 of Redwood Summer.  I’m going through the entire draft of the novel making final changes and improvements before I approach an agent.  Redwood Summer takes place in 1990 San Jose, CA, and this chapter is set in the main character’s workplace during the early summer.  All 17 chapters of Redwood Summer are posted on my site.

via Redwood Summer Chapter 3

Redwood Summer Chapter 17

The parties, family gatherings, career change, leaving of school, ordeals, dispersement of friends to their separate lives, and all the other life events of the past year ran through Jason’s mind as he continued to look out the passenger side window from a work truck as Hal drove. He gazed ahead to the dry, golden hills in the distance covered with light brown grass, then another memory came to mind as he thought back to a time when he and his friends drove up to the summit of the Santa Cruz Mountains, hiked into a park of enormous rocks, and looked down across the entire valley. He peered toward the south and tried to find the spot on the mountain range where they went, but the truck turned a corner and he lost sight of it.

“I tell you, Jason, your uncle’s a good guy,” Hal said as he sped past a long row of business parks and concrete tilt-ups. “He lets me work for him when I’m not making enough at my own business. Things are kind of dicey right now, but it should pick up soon. Times like this are good for the economy.”

The cab became silent, then Jason figured Hal was waiting for a response. “Yeah, I’m sure it will,” he answered reflexively. “Uncle Ray is a good guy, saved me from a dead end job.”

“Salt of the earth,” Hal proclaimed. “Ought to be more like him.”

“Yeah, there should,” Jason responded as he recalled how welcoming Uncle Ray was when he approached him for a job. Like he was expecting me, Jason thought to himself.

“You see, what we’re doing is solid,” Hal informed. “Businesses come and go, some get bought out, others move overseas, but there’s always going to be a need for construction. All the engineers and programmers and computer nerds around here, they spend their whole day in front of computer screens, never go outside, probably never get laid. Think any of them can do what we do?”

“Maybe not,” Jason replied, “but they’re the ones who come up with the ideas that keep
everything going. So what if they don’t know how to swing a hammer, they don’t need to.”

“But you can’t run a business outdoors, or this country for that matter. Every king needs a castle, and someone has to build that castle, that’s where we come in.” Hal looked around the expanse. “Sure, this place gets more crowded every year, I remember how it used to be, but that’s what keeps us in business.”

“Yep,” Jason said, “until we run out of land.”

“I wouldn’t worry about that,” Hal reassured. “There’s still enough to keep us busy for a long while. Plus there’s all those older buildings that need to be demolished and replaced. No new real estate required for that.”

“And on it goes,” Jason said partly to himself. He contemplated the perpetually onward flow of time, and its complete indifference to the changes in his own life.

“You know what,” Hal began, “we supply a necessary demand, which gives us a chance to make a decent living in the greatest country on earth. That’s something to be thankful for.” Over the radio a news talk show was discussing a pending United States military deployment to the Mideast. “Now you take that situation between Iraq and Kuwait,” he said, “all the bleeding heart types say we should avoid war, but what choice do we have? That is a key strategic part of the world.”

Jason listened to the discussion on the radio, and thought some of the people talking sounded more agitated and enthusiastic for war than they needed to be. “I don’t know,” he countered. “You think they’re telling us everything?”

“What do you mean?”

“Well the way they’re talking about it, it just sounds too neat, like something is being left out.”

“We got the biggest and best military on earth. What’s the worse that can happen?”

“What does a war on the other side of the world have to do with us?”

“Strategy, my friend,” Hal reminded.

Jason pondered. “I thought we were friends with the Russians now.”

“All the more reason to strike, they won’t get in the way.”

“But it seems like there’s still time to work it out.”

“Well, you have to look at the big picture,” Hal advised. “If all we do is talk, which is basically doing nothing, greater problems may happen. Problems that can affect our security,” he added ominously.

“It’ll still cost some lives.”

“Sometimes sacrifices have to be made for the greater good.” Hal looked over at Jason. “You don’t like war?”

“All I’m saying we shouldn’t rush into anything until we know what’s going on over there,” Jason cautioned.

“I’ll tell you what’s going on,” Hal said confidentially. “Over there is where most of the world’s black gold is, that’s what fuels industry, the economy, pretty much all of civilization, and we got to have a foothold there if we want to get our share. It’s all a matter of survival.”

“What about the people already living there?”

Hal laughed. “Are you kidding me? A bunch of sand niggers who’ve been killing each other for centuries? We got to go in there, straighten the whole mess out, and put everyone back in their place. That’s what we do.”

Jason looked down an avenue they were crossing and in the distance noticed the building where his last job was. “Since when?”

“Okay, all kidding aside,” Hal started. “Everyone does have a right to an opinion, that’s the American way, but when the shit goes down you don’t want to be caught on the wrong side.” They drove along further. “You know what I’m saying, right?”

Jason listened closer to the talking on the radio. The debate had become heated and antagonistic as the voices rose to a higher pitch. He sensed Hal still looking at him, and he felt the push of coercion. “You know what,” he began, “I work, I pay taxes, I’m a good citizen, and I have the right to believe in what I want, when I want, how I want,” he asserted. “And no one can tell me different!” He was surprised by the righteousness of his declaration, and it dawned upon him that he was free. “Yeah,” he said to himself, “I’d fight for that.”

Hal appeared to want to respond, but silently drove on. Jason then remembered his plans for the upcoming weekend with Christine and some friends, as well as some people from their new neighborhood. Something to look forward to, he thought happily.

                                                                                THE END

©2018 Robert Kirkendall

Redwood Summer Chapter 16

Jason drove along a Central Valley freeway through large expanses of agriculture. In the distance he saw the prison, a desolate cluster of rectangular, institutional buildings imposing upon the surrounding open space. He exited off the freeway as he approached and drove to the visitor lot. He parked and felt a little uneasy as he passed under a guard tower and entered an outer gate into the stark compound. He walked down a concrete path lined with high cyclone fencing topped with a long coil of concertina wire. He entered a building, went through a metal detector, signed a visitor log, and a guard led him to a drab room with a row of chairs lined up in front of glass partitions. He followed the guard and walked behind the other visitors. He noticed the grim looking prisoners behind glass panes out of the corner of his eye. The guard pointed him to a chair and he sat down.

Jason looked through the glass pane, then saw Randy approach. His heart sank a little when he saw him in his prison uniform. Randy sat down across him. Jason picked up the receiver, and Randy did the same. He was unsure of what to say.

“So how you been?” Randy finally asked.

“Not bad,” Jason answered. “How about you?”

“I’m settling in, getting to know the rest of the guys,” Randy said from the other side of the glass. “What choice do I have anyways, right?” he said jokingly. Jason involuntarily smiled along with him.

“Yeah,” Jason agreed. He struggled with the sight of Randy in prison.

“Some of the guys here,” Randy continued, “you should hear their stories.”

“I bet.”

“And I thought I had it bad.”

“Seems like no matter how bad it is,” Jason realized, “somebody always has it worse.”

“Guess I had to learn that the hard way,” Randy said half kiddingly.

Jason remained serious. “So what’s it like in here?”

“It ain’t complicated. They got everybody on the same schedule, same old routine, day in, day out. So I do what they tell me to do, stay out of trouble, and count the days. I’ll be out of here someday.”

“Sounds strict.”

“Yeah, took some getting used to.”

“I guess it could be worse,” Jason said.

“Yeah, but it could also be a whole lot better,” Randy replied. “Bad as it is, I didn’t think I was going to miss the outside world so much. I really miss is being able to bullshit people, can’t do that here. But I’m making the best of it.”

“I suppose that’s all you can do,” Jason said resignedly. “But I can’t get used to seeing you like this.”

“At least I know where my next meal is coming from, and you can’t beat the rent,” Randy said with a smile.

Jason wanted to smile along with Randy, but couldn’t.

“I’ve also been doing some reading,” Randy continued. “Nothing too difficult, but it’s a change. Used to be I was too busy for school, but I’ve got plenty of time now.”

Jason was surprised that he was feeling slightly envious over of his own lack of free time.

“So how are things on the outside?” Randy asked.

“Everyone’s doing all right,” Jason answered. “They sure do miss you.”

“Not as much as I miss them,” Randy said longingly. “I even miss the people I didn’t like,” he added amusedly.

“How about Gina?”

Randy laughed. “I burned that bridge to a crisp.”

“You remember Terry’s little brother?” Jason asked.

“Yeah, the one who joined the Navy.”

“Looks like he might be headed to the Persian Gulf.”

“Really.”

“It’s not for certain yet, but if things keep on going the way they’re going…” Jason trailed off.

“I can remember when he was was just a toddler,” Randy reminisced.

“You know, he only signed up was for the college money,” Jason said. “Didn’t think he was going to see any action.”

“Yeah, he got tricked,” Randy concluded. “Hope he’s going to be all right.”

“I’m thinking he will be.” Jason said. “I don’t think this thing will drag on for too long. I’m sure they learned from all the mistakes in the last war.”

“We’ll see,” Randy said suspiciously. “I wonder if my dad knows I’m here.”

“Doesn’t your mom or your sister know where to find him?”

“I think my sister does. She said she’d try to find him and tell him.”

“Hope you hear from him.”

“Yeah,” Randy said forlornly. “Maybe he’ll write me a letter or something. So how’s Christine doing?”

“Doing well,” Jason said. “She isn’t showing yet, but she will be soon.”

“Wow, you’re going to be a dad!” Randy said happily. “That’s got to be tripping you out.”

“I’m still trying to get used to it.”

“I can’t wait to get out of here so I can see him, or her.”

“I just hope I’m up to it,” Jason admitted. “Seems only yesterday I was just a kid myself.”

“Ah, don’t worry, you’ll make a great dad,” Randy reassured. “At least you’re making more money now. How is the new job?”

“It’s more work,” Jason said, “but it is a whole lot better than the last job.”

“Good. You were really hating that other place.”

“Yeah, it was getting on my last nerve,” Jason said with recalled anger. “I have to say, this was not how I planned on changing jobs.”

“Hey, so what if your old lady had to help find a job for you. It’s all about who you know.”

“I do get to be outdoors at least,” Jason remembered, “working with my hands. If nothing else it’ll keep me in shape.”

“Yeah, you don’t want to be stuck indoors chained to a desk. How’s the pay?”

“Five bucks more an hour than the last job.”

“Right on.”

“Yeah, and I’m going to need every penny of it raising a kid.”

“And then you’ll need a raise if you two have any more kids,” Randy added encouragingly.

“One challenge at a time,” Jason resisted.

“So are you and Chris going to tie the knot?” Randy asked.

“Looks like it. We’re practically married already,” Jason added.

“Sounds like we’re both set,” Randy said with a laugh.

Jason leaned forward toward the glass. “You know, it didn’t have to be this way. All you’re doing is protecting the wrong people,” he implored. “You think they’d do the same for you?” he tried to persuade.

“They caught me red handed,” Randy reminded. “They were going to put me away no matter what, why drag other people down.”

“What about an appeal?”

“Can’t afford it, and the public defender said I needed more grounds.”

Jason felt defeated. “Wish there was something I could do.”

“Hey, at least you came to see me,” Randy said gratefully. “That means a lot.”

A regretful memory rose to the surface of Jason conscience. “Sorry for the things I said that night…you know, after that party.”

“Don’t be,” Randy brushed aside. “I’m the one who should be apologizing.”

“I never wanted you out of my life,” Jason asserted. “It’s just that things changed.”

“Yeah they did.”

“This is all fucked up,” Jason said moodily. “You don’t deserve to be stuck in here.”

“There’s always time off for good behavior,” Randy pointed out.

Jason was struck by the Randy’s optimism. He saw no reason for it, but his gloom lightened. “You should be able to swing that,” he said humorously as he finally relaxed. “At least you’re going to be paroled someday, not me. Parenthood is a life sentence.” He leaned in confidentially. “I have to admit, you may be right about Chris taking over my life.”

“You know,” Randy began completely serious, “if I had a girl like Christine in my life, I wouldn’t be stuck in here right now.”

Jason saw a long absent clarity in Randy’s eyes as they looked at each other for a long moment. “Yeah,” he finally said. “I guess I’m the lucky one.”

“Sorry I couldn’t take care of the bachelor party.”

“It’s all right,” Jason said, “probably would’ve lead to more arrests.”

“Yeah, Darren most likely,” Randy predicted, and they shared a laugh. “Send me some pictures of the wedding.”

“You got it.” Jason wanted to make the moment last. Memories of a disappeared, happier past beckoned him, and he sensed Randy was feeling the same way. He wanted to enjoy the moment some more, but he felt the pull of the outside world. “Well, I better get going.”

“Tell everybody I said hi.”

“I’ll do that.” Jason looked to Randy one last time. “Good to see you again.”

“Likewise. Don’t be a stranger.”

“I won’t.” Jason fought back tears. “Bye, Randy.”

“See you later, brother.”

Jason slowly hung up the receiver, got up, and left the stark room. He saw Randy in his periphery still seated behind the glass partition as he was departing.

 

©2018 Robert Kirkendall